Five reasons not to buy a parrot

Five reasons not to buy a parrot


Parrots love chewing on wood

Listed below are five reasons why serious consideration should be given to the purchase of a large parrot. These are only five of many more arguments against buying a parrot.


Parrots are noisy

Five reasons not to buy a parrot
Parrots are noisy Wikipedia

Do you like your quiet time? Enjoy a relaxed evening at home with friends and family? If you don't mind being interrupted mid sentence by ear-splitting screams, a parrot might suit you just fine. It is natural for most parrots to scream. Confining them to separate quarters may lead to feather plucking, and will only amplify the screaming.



Parrots love to chew

Five reasons not to buy a parrot
Parrots love to chew wikipedia

Do you collect antiques? Do you have a sentimental attachment to those treasured family heirlooms? Then don't buy a Parrot. Parrots love to chew and they are not discriminating.



Parrots are very expensive

Five reasons not to buy a parrot
Parrots are very expensive Wikipedia

Parrots are expensive. If you have several thousand dollars burning a hole in your pocket and a substantial expendable income a large parrot just might be the ticket. But beware—it is only the beginning. Veterinarian bills, cages, food, (formulated just for parrots,) and toys can sap a budget.



Parrots need plenty of attention

Five reasons not to buy a parrot
Parrots need plenty of attention Wikipedia

Parrots are sociable creatures and want to interact. Expect to spend at least an hour every day interacting with a parrot. Two to three hours of thoughtful physical contact and play time will optimize the relationship between you and your parrot. These highly intelligent birds are prone to behavior problems if neglected for any length of time.



Parrots are messy

Five reasons not to buy a parrot
Parrots are messy Wikipedia

Parrots are, by design, messy. They scatter their food, soil their dishes, and generally wreak havoc. Be ready to to invest in a good vacuum. Parrots also emit dander and many parrot owners have developed allergies to the dust from fecal matter and feather particles that birds shed when they molt. Cockatoos and African Grey parrots produce a substantial amount of dander.